North Fork Volunteer Fire Department



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  • P.O. Box 183
    Buffalo Creek, CO 80425
    Phone 303-838-2270
    Fax 303-838-0412

    Fire Suppression

    North Fork Volunteer Fire Department provides structural fire suppression services to over 500 residences and businesses. Each firefighter is provided with specialized training and has access to state of the art equipment to perform their duties.

    Structural firefighting equipment ranges from something as simple as an axe to a complex fire engine. Training on every piece of equipment and the proper uses is conducted throughout the year. Burn Building Trainings include both classroom style lectures and practical applications. In addition, every year firefighters participate in a training at a live fire training facility or "Burn Building." This allows for live fire hands-on refresher and for the development of new and improved methods.

    North Fork utilizes three type I engines carying 1000 gallons of water each, three Water Shuttle tenders (or type III engines) carying 2000 gallons of water each and one heavy rescue for structural operations.



    Due to the Department's rural location, there are no pressurized hydrant systems. North Fork is able to move enough water to fight a fire using techniques called "Drafting" and the "Water Shuttle System." This involves using atmospheric and negative pressures to take water directly from a river, stream or lake. Tender trucks shuttle the water to the scene of the fire. The tenders then release their tanks into fold-out portable tanks next to an attacking engine (or a supplying engine, if driveways or narrow roads restrict access), essentially creating a pond wherever it is needed. This cycle continues through the duration of the fire.